Emblematic

Many scattered thoughts, often about Fire Emblem

Anonymous asked: Wait, "beauty aspect has always been a part of Metroid"? What? What part of the atmosphere and sci fi setting had THAT?

iancsamson:

I perhaps worded that badly - The beauty aspect has always been part of Samus’s character ever since she removed her helmet and let her flowing locks wave in the breeze, while wearing a bikini.

But, continuing the beauty contrast angle - there’s beauty in the worlds she visits, as dangerous as they are. Phendrana Drifts comes to mind especially, but most fit in. The Metroids themselves are veiny, brainy jellyfish, but in the right light, they’re cute, and there’s a sublime kind of beauty there too, especially considering the larvae. It’s just about seeing things in a different light, seeing what’s beneath the surface, and seeing things as they could be rather than what they’re perceived to be.

That’s not universal in all things in the Metroid series - Mother Brain is as monstrous as she is ugly, as are her major minions. But then again, she was originally seen as a boon to her world - a helpful influence that could do great things. And then, they saw her real self.

So yeah, all about what lies under the shell, and who they really are underneath.

I wouldn’t quite agree here. I agree that the Metroid series is all about environments and ecosystems, and indeed I would argue the real characterisation of the games is done of worlds, not of people. Samus’ character is quite undefined: but I know an awful lot about the unique appearance, atmosphere, and character of Zebes, of Tallon IV, of Aether, of SR388, of Elysia, or of any other of the worlds visited.

 

Often the investigation of those worlds does involve a contrast between superficial beauty and very real danger, though I’m not sure I’d say that’s central. I don’t think Zebes is beautiful, as such. But Zebes is a world that’s getting on perfectly fine on its own, in which you are an intruder. Metroids are intruders as well – and outside cartoon depictions I don’t think they’re cute or beautiful at all – but have taken over to such a point that you are still an intruder in a strange land. The Metroids were part of the ecosystem of SR388. Even on Zebes, the Pirates’ base and all their technology was so closely integrated into the natural ecosystem of the planet as to seem as if it had always been there. Even in Fusion, where there is no natural environment, you are still disturbing a structured environment that doesn’t need you, and the gradual failure of the station’s artificial containment systems to prevent the spread of the X ecosystem underlines the entire game.

 

I would question the significance of Samus’ character overall, because I don’t think Samus as a person is centralised in the Metroid games. (Except for, reports tell me, in the one game we don’t talk about.) When I’m playing Super Metroid or Metroid Prime, I am not concentrating on Samus. In the 3D games, I can’t even see her. I’m focusing on the environment. Samus is a tool through which I vicariously explore the game environment. In a way, Samus is more like the mascot of the Metroid series than its main character. Whenever I play a game in the series, I am the person in the armour.

 

This isn’t to say I don’t have ideas about Samus as a person, and I’ve talked about that at great length; just to say that I don’t think she as a person is the key focus. The worlds are more important.

April 8th - Zero Suit Samus joins the battle!

(Pictures removed to avoid clutter, click here for more.)

…Nintendo.

Do we really have to have this conversation again, Nintendo?

Look, the zero suit does make sense for what you’d wear underneath the power suit. I’m glad we agree on that. It was used well in Zero Mission, to convey a sense of vulnerability and tension. It was used rather less well in SSBB, where it was clearly used for sex appeal, the camera hugged Samus’ body, and we were given the awkward implication of Samus’ super move involving stripping.

And now you put high heels on it?

Are you even trying, Nintendo?

(Source: smashbrotherhood, via oracleether)

Mwahaha! Time to talk more about Robin and Lucina!

oracleether:

Because lately I’ve been thinking about Robin’s choice near the end of the game in regards to Grima, sacrificing herself and by extension, the reaction of her spouse. This post just ruined me and made me think about it more. A lot of us wanted to think about the ‘how’ as in how the spouse of choice would react before the decision, when Robin would confess what she plans to do to her husband. Which they’d talk about it, and maybe they’d even argue over the ‘why’ just a little.

This is probably something I should add to my last post on the subject, because Robin’s decision at the end of the game ties in very nicely with the course of that relationship. It recalls the crucial cutscene at the end of ‘Five Gemstones’.

 It is, after all, the exact same decision. Robin dies to end the threat of Grima. It is the same, right? Right?

 

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© 姉

Have I complained enough about paralogue characters not having supports yet?
I was just thinking about Emmeryn and pacifism again, apropos of nothing in particular. (It is something I have written about before.) How does it look in hindsight? Pacifism, war, and the morality of political violence is something very interesting to me, and I would have been interested in FE13 reflected on those things a bit more.
I can’t help but think that making Emmeryn mute after the paralogue was a major error, because Emmeryn/Gangrel or Emmeryn/Walhart conversations are the perfect opportunity for the game to pause just before its conclusion and reflect on some of the questions it had previously raised.
What does Emmeryn think of the wars Chrom has led? Does she support them? If so, does this make her a hypocrite? Is Emmeryn (as depicted in the art) capable of or willing to forgive Gangrel? Would doing so itself be hypocritical, or an insult to the countless Ylisseans and Plegians who died because of him?
From Gangrel’s perspective, isn’t there just as much to make of it? He argued that Plegia was united in belief; or rather, united in hatred for Ylisse. (“I want what every Plegian wants—a grisly end for every last Ylissean!”) Yet Emmeryn’s sacrifice appealed so strongly to the people of Plegia that the army itself put down its weapons and chanted her name. What does that prove?
What I find interesting here is the balance between pacifism and militarism. Emmeryn’s unfettered pacifism was surely flawed: it made Ylisse vulnerable to Plegian invasion, and even if Plegia had not invaded, the Ylissean continent would surely then have fallen to Valm. Some measure of martial strength is needed. But Gangrel’s pure militarism - like Walhart’s, for that matter - also proved unsuccessful, and to an extent was disarmed and weakened by Emmeryn’s pacifist conviction. Arguably what makes Chrom’s leadership effective is his ability to combine military strength with pacifism conviction; that is, to fight for peace, subordinating violence to a greater cause and transforming it through that context.
I do wonder what Emmeryn would have to say about it…

©

Have I complained enough about paralogue characters not having supports yet?

I was just thinking about Emmeryn and pacifism again, apropos of nothing in particular. (It is something I have written about before.) How does it look in hindsight? Pacifism, war, and the morality of political violence is something very interesting to me, and I would have been interested in FE13 reflected on those things a bit more.

I can’t help but think that making Emmeryn mute after the paralogue was a major error, because Emmeryn/Gangrel or Emmeryn/Walhart conversations are the perfect opportunity for the game to pause just before its conclusion and reflect on some of the questions it had previously raised.

What does Emmeryn think of the wars Chrom has led? Does she support them? If so, does this make her a hypocrite? Is Emmeryn (as depicted in the art) capable of or willing to forgive Gangrel? Would doing so itself be hypocritical, or an insult to the countless Ylisseans and Plegians who died because of him?

From Gangrel’s perspective, isn’t there just as much to make of it? He argued that Plegia was united in belief; or rather, united in hatred for Ylisse. (“I want what every Plegian wants—a grisly end for every last Ylissean!”) Yet Emmeryn’s sacrifice appealed so strongly to the people of Plegia that the army itself put down its weapons and chanted her name. What does that prove?

What I find interesting here is the balance between pacifism and militarism. Emmeryn’s unfettered pacifism was surely flawed: it made Ylisse vulnerable to Plegian invasion, and even if Plegia had not invaded, the Ylissean continent would surely then have fallen to Valm. Some measure of martial strength is needed. But Gangrel’s pure militarism - like Walhart’s, for that matter - also proved unsuccessful, and to an extent was disarmed and weakened by Emmeryn’s pacifist conviction. Arguably what makes Chrom’s leadership effective is his ability to combine military strength with pacifism conviction; that is, to fight for peace, subordinating violence to a greater cause and transforming it through that context.

I do wonder what Emmeryn would have to say about it…

(via farfallenhope)

queenlua: care to share what you didn’t like about the southern raiders episode? this isn’t me being aggressive or upset or anything, i’m just surprised, since i thought it was one of the best, and i’m curious for your thoughts, haha

First off, I’m not trying to be confrontational, and I’m not really angry or anything. I just like talking about shows I’ve watched. An episode that didn’t really work for me might work great for you. It’s not about trying to take away your enjoyment of the show, but about sharing our views.

So. ‘The Southern Raiders’ wasn’t a very good episode, in my opinion. Why is that? (Needless to say, heavy spoilers for the episode will follow.)

 

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katreus:

Epilogue:

  • Anwen’s skills and fame grew into those of a legendary Ranger who traveled far and wide across the lands of Ashan.
  • Godric became Lord High Constable of the Griffin Empire and the right hand of both King Alexei and his son, King Nicolai. 
  • Fiona married Prince Alexei, becoming Queen Fiona and mother of King Nicolai. .
  • Aidan, steadfast in his hatred of demons, joined the fabled order of the Dragon Knights and continued his personal war against the hordes of Urgash. 
  • Nadia and Cyrus eventually married and gave birth to a young mage named Zehir, who came to rule the Silver Cities. 

But wait, it doesn’t end there!

Clash of Heroes' epilogues are misleading. A bunch of these characters appear or are mentioned in Heroes of Might and Magic V, where we learn their fate.

  • Anwen went on to become a random Sylvan hero, who does not appear in the campaign. Her brief biography there calls her the ‘Sword of Sylanna’ and indicates that she became a powerful and respected ranger.
  • Anwen’s comrade Findan became an elven diplomat and poet who is the central character of the HoMM V Sylvan campaign. Findan helps to defeat the Demon Sovereign and survives the entire game and its expansions. Yay!
  • Godric became an experienced knight and general, and spent most of HoMM V being the sole voice of sanity in the Griffin Empire. He even has his own theme! (Albeit a remix of the Haven theme.) He was loyal, true, and generally cool, but eventually got killed after a frankly implausible sequence of events in which a shapeshifting succubus imitated the queen. He died of his wounds after being tortured by minions of said false queen, but his faith in Elrath was such that a bunch of angels showed up to take him to the afterlife. Also, Elrath squished a bunch of bad guys for him with divine might, and then his daughter became the queen. So he didn’t do too badly for himself.
  • Alexei was emperor for a while, and led the combined Haven, Sylvan, and Academy armies against the demons. When the battle was won, Alexei promptly LEEROYed into the portal to Sheogh, banishing the demons but dying in the attempt. (The other allied leaders, Alaron of the elves and Cyrus - yes, the same one - of the wizards just sort of sat there in confusion while this happened.)
  • Alexei’s son Nicolai became king after this, and fell in love with a not-terribly-bright duchess, died on the battlefield fighting even more demons, was resurrected as a soulless vampire by said not-terribly-bright duchess after she became queen, and tried to burn down the elven homelands. Then Findan killed him. Um, yay?
  • Fiona became queen of the Griffin Empire and made Markal, the necromancer she met in Heresh, her chief advisor. Markal went on to be evil and creepy, so Godric and Cyrus kicked him out. Markal talks to Fiona’s skeleton like a crazy person and turned Nicolai into a vampire. He went around being evil until Godric, Findan, and Zehir finally killed him.
  • Aidan is never mentioned again, anywhere else, but since demons rampage around causing problems for rather a long time afterwards, we can assume his personal war didn’t go all that well.
  • Nadia died at some point before HoMM V starts (childbirth?), and Cyrus schemed his way to becoming head of the Silver Cities. Cyrus became a curmudgeonly jerk, helped Alexei against the demons, refused to help Nicolai against the demons, and got killed by Markal in revenge.
  • Nadia and Cyrus’ son, Zehir, was effeminate and wore too much make-up, and also was an extremely powerful mage who came to rule the Silver Cities as well. Zehir, Godric, Findan, and a dark elf named Raelag (it’s a long story, tl;dr he’s a douche) made a big demon-fighting team and killed lots of demons. So everyone was happy!
  • Except the demons.

You may notice that the voice acting and direction in the above cinematics was generally pretty dire. That’s because the story of Heroes of Might and Magic V is sort of hilariously bad. There is a convenient summary here, which I recommend you read.

Continuing the conversation about Theros and Greek values. I’ll try to trim it down as well, for convenience.

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(Source: irandrura)

braro asked: Which M!Robin support do you think gets the most actual support?

Hm, let’s see…

 I’ll say straight off that I’m not offended by any of the Robin/future-child supports. The ‘children’ are all clearly adults when they get to the present, and some are actually older than their supposed parents. I don’t get a sense of ick from any of them except the actually incestuous ships. I think Owain/Lucina is the only one guaranteed to be incestuous, but I think you can get a couple of others that way too, and the game only outright forbids brother/sister incest.

 I suppose I should look at the list. M!Robin can marry: Lissa, Sully, Miriel, Sumia, Maribelle, Panne, Cordelia, Nowi, Tharja, Olivia, Lucina, Say’ri, Flavia, Anna, Kjelle, Cynthia, Severa, Noire, Nah, Tiki, Emmeryn, or Aversa.

 Judging purely from the supports…

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So, a friend recently commented to me that they might give the Robin/Lucina ship a go, after my longer thoughts on it earlier. To my surprise, this made me feel rather nervous, and I thought about why.

You see, I think the game is only the starting point for most ships. The bulk of a successful ship occurs in the player’s imagination, and is often supplemented by fandom: art, fiction, and so on. My experience of a particular imagined relationship is going to be different to yours. These experiences can be shared through dialogue, but it’s rather naïve to imagine that someone else will read the same scenes and, purely from that, have the same emotional experiences. I’ve noticed this about plenty of other popular ships as well. The premise of a relationship between two characters serves primarily as a jumping-off point for further imagination and creativity.

Unnamed friend: I hope you enjoy it, but I don’t know if you will. You’re not me, and have your own preferences. For what it’s worth I think that the actual support is pretty weak.

Wow, this is…

Wow.

I know this reblog was a troll, and you shouldn’t respond to those, but this is from so long ago and so random and bizarre that I feel I have to.

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(Source: irandrura)